Friday, May 13, 2022

Wet But Warmer

A catch-up posting here.  As often happens, our weather has turned from will-winter-never-end to summer's-here.  The rains have also been wild with lots of lightning and thunder.
 
In the past 24 hours we've gotten over 2-1/2" of rain which, added to the snow melt and recent previous rainfalls, have caused wash-outs on several county roads in our area.  All streams and waterways are rushing and gushing like we've not seen in years.
 
Two days ago, with a slight drying of soil, Papa Pea got my flat gardening areas tilled for the season.  Now that the areas are ready, it will be several days before it's dry enough that I can think of planting peas and potatoes, the two crops I would have liked to have had in by now.
 

Do you think we went a bit overboard with the pruning of these two apple trees?  Sadly, they're in the process of being taken down as they've lived out their productive years and are no longer able to give us more than a few apples.  New trees have been planted to take their place.
 
I've got a few of my raised garden beds planted.  Onions are all in the ground as are turnips and carrots.  Trellises for other veggies are in place.  As soon as the soil is dry enough, lots of other cool weather crops will go in.
 
The strawberries are weeded and there's all but a few feet of mulch between the rows left to be put in place.  The bed is getting old and I wish I had the time to start new plants in a different area but this spring is chock full of too many projects already so that will have to go on the list for a year from now.
 

Speaking of strawberries, last weekend I finished this small piece.  I had the x-stitching done last year but couldn't decide how to go from there.  I finally went with simple, added the red border and it's now a small 8-1/2" square pillow that will sit as decoration on a shelf.  Strawberry harvest will start for us right around the end of June/first of July so it will be ready for that this year. 
 
The busy time out-of-doors has begun and my first-of-the-season achy gardening muscles have almost disappeared.  Onward with the planting and then obsessively watching it all grow.

17 comments:

Anonymous said...

Let the fun begin! Even though we had almost a week of lows in the high 30’s and crazy icy winds flying down the mountain things are taking a turn here too.

Enjoy your Spring and strawberries to come.

Mama Pea said...

Anonymous - Oh, those icy winds sound terrible, especially for this time of year. Good to hear all that may be over now. Today is a beautiful sunny day (so far) so it should help with the drying. Although it's opening fishing weekend and because of all the snow we had this winter, most of the lakes are still snow and ice covered which I know is a big disappointment for all fishermen. :o(

Michelle said...

Still much too wet here to work the ground, but that makes it prime weeding weather. With all my time in TX the exuberant biomass has gotten well ahead of me (who am I kidding; it always does), so I'm contemplating paying the neighbor's landscape guy to put in a few hours to help me catch up. Love your pillow!

Mama Pea said...

Michelle - Given your current circumstances I think getting help with your garden, etc. is an excellent idea. Thanks for complimenting my strawberry pillow!

Rosalea said...

Full sun and 88F out now. Too, too hot for mid-May, and I am hiding out inside this PM. We had frost Monday morning, now this. Everything is popping. Please send some of that rain our way! It is very dry, and expect to be under a fire ban soon if we aren't already. Hoping to put up trellises tomorrow, and get planting areas marked out in the field garden as per the paper plan. Spuds are in. Good to know that the achy muscles will disappear!
Your pillow is perfect.

Mama Pea said...

Rosalea - Eight-eight degrees out?! That is way too hot for this time of year. At least it should be in your location. I know it sure would be here. I'm just in from my day outside. (What the heck is for dinner??) We had sunshine and a beautiful 65° today. (Sorry, don't mean to be mean.) I wanted to do more planting but even the raised beds are too wet from our recent nights of rain. Will try to send the next round of moisture we get your way. No fun having to think of fire danger.

Leigh said...

Isn't it wonderful when the weather finally says it's okay to garden? I'm curious as to how old those apple trees are. We have two that I think are at end of life, too. At least they're starting to look like it.

Kristina said...

I never got to plant peas this year, and now worried I won't get radishes unless I put them in grow bags. My husband has not had time to till. He is working 12 hour days, 6 days a week, and has an hour drive there and back. It has been a very worrisome garden year. I may have to hire someone to come till. I sure do miss sugar snap peas.

Mama Pea said...

Leigh - The apple trees are semi-dwarfs which supposedly have a productive life of 15-25 years. Ours are very close to 25 years old so we really can't complain. There is another one planted at the same time that still bears a good amount of apples, though, so we're doing what we can to keep it happy!

Kristina - You have had so much bad luck in the past few years with your gardening! Is there a portion of the garden you can work up by hand just so you can put in some things like your radishes? I used to do our whole garden (it wasn't quite so big then) with a spading fork before we got a tiller.

Goatldi said...

Very odd that. I see in my first comment I am anonymous ??? Wonder how I will appear this time?

Goatldi

Mama Pea said...

Goatldi - Your vibes must have been coming through loud and clear as I had a strong feeling that "Anon" comment was from you! Blogger was playing tricks on you apparently. Hope all is well!

Tim B. Inman said...

Planting trees is always good. Peach trees only live about 10 to 12 years here (unless they get frozen several times in the spring, which happens, then they're done). During the years my wife was so ill, we sort of stopped the 'continuous planting' rotation. Now, I have a couple of ancient peaches that 'might' give me a peach - and a whole new crop of juveniles. I suppose in a couple of years I'll have peaches coming out my ears and wonder why I planted so many trees. I like planting trees though. Good for you.

Mama Pea said...

Tim - When those peaches start coming out of your ears, feel free to send them our way. ;o) We've given up on trying to successfully grow peaches or apricots which I would dearly love to have. Even our pear and plum trees succumbed to our too cold temperatures. Apple trees seem to be hardy enough and do well most years. And we're happy about that.

Anonymous said...

Mama Pea and Leigh
I’m not quite sure why this is happening or how it’s happening but for some reason Mama pea I just got the post that you did to Tim in my email this is getting weird ladies why is it coming to me?

I’m not quite sure why this is happening or how it’s happening but for some reason Mama pea I just got the post that you did to Tim in my email this is getting weird ladies why is it coming to me?
I’ve always known I was special but this is ridiculous lol

Mama Pea said...

Anonymous - Your guess is as good as mine! There certainly does seem to be some kind of a glitch (or a continuation of glitches!) that is being caused by "headquarters" wherever that is and whoever is in charge of it. Some folks say the whole blogging program is on the way out (hope not!) and is not being supported correctly. Or . . . maybe you really are special! ;o)

Tim B. Inman said...

Peaches are 'iffy' here. Sometimes I'm in the same cold zone as you are. Sometimes not. Sometimes on the same day. In good years, peaches are great. It is a struggle to keep 'em going though; I think worth it. A thought: Pears should be OK for you. Kieffer is a tough fantastic cooking pear that should grow for you. Another thought: It might be the root stock that is your weak link. Dwarfing stocks tend to be tender. If you can find a Reliance peach on standard rootstock, I'd give it a go. ORRRR: Put a peach on super dwarf rootstock in a half plastic drum full of potting soil - on a pallet - and bring it into a shed for the winter. It works. Never give in!

Mama Pea said...

Tim - All good info from one who knows what he's talking about! I thank you for sharing. :o)