Friday, October 13, 2017

Still Here, Still Movin'

I've heard from a couple of blogland friends lately wondering if all is well here since I've not posted for a while.  All is well, very well, but I haven't felt as though I had much of interest to share.  So here goes with some of what's been happening, interesting or not.

Garden clean-up continues.  And continues.  Grumpy-dumpy me has declared I'm never planting a garden again.  (Yeah, right.)  Doesn't seem fair that de-structing a garden should take almost as much time as planting it does. 


We have tomatoes coming out of our ears.  Well, the cherry variety any way.  We've had one light frost, but not a killing frost so remarkably enough the tomatoes are still ripening.  We'll take 'em as long as we can get 'em.

Still have potatoes and carrots to dig and the pepper plants under the cold frames continue to produce.  Slicing cucumbers in their cold frame are not looking so great.  I'm thinking the vines may be relocated to the compost heap soon.  Maybe today.


I baked two batches of bread yesterday.  Haven't made any homemade bread in I don't know how long.  Felt good.  Tasted good, too.

We have a bunch of poultry that is mad at us right now.


Integrating the mature hens and the youngun's from this spring has begun.  They've all been captured and are in lock down in the chicken house and attached solarium for a number of days until the young birds find their place in the flock and realize that's their home now.  No more bedding down in either a chicken tractor . . . or a tree!


The ducks that are headed for Freezer Camp (date coming up soon) are corralled in one big pen.  Catching them has not been fun.


They have learned that it's a real kick to flap their little wings and fly.  Some were even taking to roosting on the solar panels.  Yes, on the top of the solar panels.  Way up there.  We've been lucky (and amazed) that none of them have flown the coop, so to speak, and gone over their pasture fence into territories unknown.


These are three of the four ducks we've been unable to catch thus far.  But we shall prevail.


The nine geese are soon to be reduced to a gaggle of six.


"Yikes, that's not news we wanted to hear," say the geese.


Fall is such a gorgeous season in the north woods.  Wish it would last until December 1st when it could start snowing.

16 comments:

Kristina said...

I know what you mean about taking out the garden. I'm not even 10% done with that job. First year for me to do it all on my own, and take care of everything else. Those tomatoes look great by the way.

MrsDuncanMahogany said...

My tomatoes are still producing with a light frost as well! I think, at least with my garden, the deconstructing of it takes longer than planting. I am excited to plant so maybe its just my perception of planting versus unplanting? :) Its a beautiful time of year, and I too wish the snow would come December 1st and then buzz off end of January. Wishful thinking.

Michelle said...

I'm supposed to deconstruct my garden??? Hmm, maybe THAT'S why prepping ours come spring takes so long!

Lisa said...

You've been busy! And that bread looks delicious! We've been cutting back on bread and oh how I miss the homemade goodness. And your colors are already so beautiful up there. Have a good weekend!!

coffeeontheporchwithme said...

Your birds all look so big and healthy! Good luck on catching those last four ducks. When we had hens, it was always a pain when we had to try to catch one. I haven't even started putting the garden to bed, good job that you already are! -Jenn

Mama Pea said...

Kristina - In a perverse way, you've made me feel better about not having the garden completely ready for winter yet. At least I'm more than 10% done!! ;o)

Mama Pea said...

MrsDM - Yes! I so agree that it seems deconstructing the garden takes longer than planting it! But that can't possibly be so. Can it??

Hmmm, methinks you are not a snow lover . . .

Mama Pea said...

Geez, Michelle, get with the program here! ;o}

Just once a few years ago I left the garden clean-up until spring. Arrrgh, I'll never do that again!

Mama Pea said...

Lisa - Oh, but just think how wonderful even the baking of homemade bread is! (Sorry, I'm bad. You're doing the right thing in watching your bread intake. Good girl.)

I think our colors peaked sometime this past week. They're still lovely but so many of the leaves are on the ground now. Beautiful on the side roads though with that carpet of red and golden cover.

Hope you have a great weekend, too, my friend.

Mama Pea said...

Jenn - I spotted a HUGE fishing net in our resale store and bought it ($3.00) thinking that would be just the thing for nabbing those elusive last ducks. Hope it works!

Now get thee out into the garden and start that clean-up, girl!

Rain said...

Hi Mama Pea :)) So no more garden (again?) next year huh? ;) I felt the same way after my disastrous harvest. But you know...it's going to happen lol! I wish I had all of your tomatoes. I did get some nice ones at the market, but I was so hoping to have way too many this year! I hope you get all of your potatoes and carrots up before it gets too cold! I love seeing photos of your fowl. And that solar panel is great! Are you self-sufficient with solar for your power?

Fall is really gorgeous in the north isn't it? I love the colours, the fragrance...everything is so beautiful. But you're right, it's way too short. It seems like winter is the only season that lasts too long isn't it?

Theresa Young said...

Your potatoes in your last entry are huge. Mine were just medium size. Got a couple of large sweet potatoes. When do you dig yours up? I did mine the end of September when most of the vine has died back. Do you wait till there's no green vine at all? I want huge potatoes like yours. Any help would be appreciated as I plan to plant again next year.

Susan said...

I am trying to rustle up the courage (and time) to get out into my garden and put it to bed (ahem) for the year. So far, all I have done is look at it from afar and wring my hands. You and Papa Pea have a big job on your hands every season, but you sure make the most of it! I bet it will be nice to downsize the flock before winter.

Mama Pea said...

Rain - We can squeeze about 1/2 to 3/4 of our energy supplies from our solar panels, depending on the time of year and sunlight available. If we had to we could operate completely off-grid simply by being more efficient in our use of power. Our electric bill is not high (because of the solar on many circuits we do use) so at this time, it's a comfortable combination.

Mama Pea said...

Theresa - If weather allows (no continued freezing), we wait until into November to dig our whole crop of potatoes. We have trouble getting our root cellar to cool down soon enough to safely store all the root vegetables so figure they are better off in the ground in the garden until as late as we can wait. Right now, October 19th, all of our potato vines are dead, dead, dead! I do feel the size of the potatoes increases as long as you can leave them in the ground . . . up to a point, I'm sure. Unfortunately, we've had such a wet spring, summer and fall that I'm a little concerned about slug damage as the little buggers get hungrier and hungrier!

I plant my potatoes in a trench (about 4" deep) and really mound the earth up around them. (That's where they grow.) And then hill them up over the top of the vines when the vines reach about 6" tall. More friable soil for the taters to grow in.

Mama Pea said...

Susan - Who the heck ever has the energy or enthusiasm for putting a garden to bed in the fall? Not me!

Once all the butchering day passes, we will definitely have easier chore times. AND less feed to feed out. Less drinking water to keep available for the birds, too. It goes on and on!