Monday, February 6, 2017

Minnesota Kimchi Recipe Request

After my post last week talking of our daughter making up some more kimchi for us, I had a couple of requests for the recipe.  You can find a detailed post I wrote on making kimchi last summer by clicking here.

This summer I used our bountiful harvest of slicing cukes from the garden which I don't have currently available obviously, so I decided to have her give the recipe a try substituting the cukes with chopped cabbage that we still have in the root cellar.

The same recipe (which has since been dubbed Minnesota Kimchi) in the post of August 16, 2016, was used with the substitution of cabbage for cucumbers.  (We used less than the whole medium sized head of the cabbage for two quart jars of kimchi.)

A suggestion I would have if you are using sea salt (recommended) is that before you start the process of preparing the veggies, etc., you should start soaking the sea salt in the 1/4 cup of whey and stir it frequently while chopping the other ingredients because sea salt doesn't want to dissolve as readily as other salts.

This summer I used whey leftover after making cottage cheese, but since we don't eat nearly as much cottage cheese in the winter time, I obtained my whey last week by putting a quart container of organic plain yogurt into a cheesecloth bag and hanging it to drip into a bowl overnight.  That gives you a nice amount of good whey (what you don't use immediately can be frozen) and also a nice substitute for cream cheese left in the cheesecloth bag.


As the quart jar of ingredients is being filled, we keep tamping it down which releases some of the juices in the vegetables.  Something I didn't mention in the August post was that once the jar is filled with veggies, I dump the ingredients into a medium sized bowl and mix it all up, then refill the jar.

Would it work by just leaving the pretty layers in the jar without mixing?  I don't know, but probably.  It just seems to me everything has a better chance of "working" by being mixed up.

How was the kimchi made with the cabbage last week?  Zingy, tasty, and good!  No problem consuming our 1/4 cup a day to keep us healthy, wealthy and wise.  (Well, healthy anyway.)

I can't think of anything else to add, but if you find the time or have the inclination to give making kimchi a try and have questions, just ask.

14 comments:

Susan said...

I've got a question, Professor Pea! (Hand is raised) Do you use a regular screw on lid - closed tightly or slightly closed? Just wondering if my kimchi would explode if the cap was on tight and it built up a head of steam.

Mama Pea said...

Dear Seeking to Learn More - I use a ring and lid (need not be a new one) as I would on a jar to be canned. Don't tighten it with a wrench (!), but hand tighten it. Sometimes you will notice one of the lids "dome up" a bit. Just unscrew it and let the built up head of steam escape. Then screw the ring and lid back on again. Easy peasy.

Goatldi said...

I see a teachers pet here. 😉 But I am glad for the question and the nice instructions plus references as I will put this on my to do list. I have done sauerkraut I image it is about the same drill in real life?

Mama Pea said...

Goatldi - Yep, old-fashioned sauerkraut made in a crock was/is a fantastic fermented food. I do love good sauerkraut but this kimchi is easier to eat out of a little dish each day. (Now you've got me thinking of sauerkraut and pork chops!)

Kristina said...

Oh, thank you. I don't have cabbage right now, but I may be buying some organic to try this.

Anonymous said...

Thank you. I was wondering about the lid also. organic cabbage is on my list :) I'm still wondering where is winter, thunder storms and nearly 70 degree today

Sue

Mama Pea said...

Kristina - I don't know what organic heads of cabbage are going for in your area, but the good thing is chopped up it gives you a lot. I have to buy the fresh sweet red peppers (which aren't cheap!), but they add so much to the mix. Otherwise, I have everything else.

Mama Pea said...

Sue - Don't know where you are located but 70 degrees in the winter is not winter to me! ;o)

Anonymous said...

I live in Kentucky. This is the warmest winter that I can remember.
Sue

Mama Pea said...

Sue - The warm temps have got to be hard on your perennial plants (even trees and such) that need the "rest" period over winter. I've always lived where there were 4 definite seasons. Don't know how I'd adjust to a more moderate climate!

Sandy said...

Mama Pea,

I have a silly question.....can you add radish to the mix of veggies?

Mama Pea said...

Sandy - Silly question? Not at all! Oh, yes, radishes sound wonderful. Of course, I eat radishes fresh from the garden (I do wash them first) by the bowlful. (Honestly.) Most folks think I'm a little strange, but hubby says there must be something in the radishes that my system needs. Crunch, crunch . . . now you've made me yearn for those first spring radishes!

Laurie said...

I still haven't tried your Kimchi recipe. I'm almost out of my sauerkraut though and it got me to thinking about it again. I actually just did a search for your recipe and this post popped up. How cool is that? I think I may get to it this weekend.

Mama Pea said...

Laurie - Be sure to let me know how you like it if you do make the kimchi. It's so good for us that it will be worth it for that alone!