Tuesday, April 16, 2013

The Last of the Last


The good thing (for the cook) was that we had a very simple dinner last night of creamed eggs with peas over toast.

The bad thing was that I (the cook) used the very l-a-s-t package of fresh frozen peas from last summer's garden.

Dang and drat.  Sigh.

Peas are our very favorite veggie from the garden.  Yet I've never managed to grow and put up enough of 'em to last us harvest to harvest.

Wonder how many acres of shell peas I would need to plant to accomplish that little feat?

26 comments:

Lisa said...

We grew peas for the first time ever in our garden last year and they fast became our favorite... wondering why that never happened before. Whenever we had guests(family) out, that was the first place in the garden we'd take them to to taste the youngest, tenderest peas straight from the pod when it's the sweetest. Ooooh, my mouth is watering now! How much do you ordinarily put up each year? Are you able to grow two seasons of peas?

Using the last of our harvest is a double-edged sword to me, because in one way it's nice to see the bottom of the freezer, yet in another.... it's all gone for a while!

Hope you are having a good non-snowy day today!

Carolyn said...

Ok, exactly WHAT is that (the recipe) and WHY haven't I had that? I like eggs, creamed anything, peas and toast.

We're always pea-short here too, but I have no excuse as I technically could have already put them in the ground...like three weeks ago. Maybe you can plant some "Snow" peas? ha.

Tombstone Livestock said...

Yup, I think you need to build a green house. I have about 20 windows, wanted to build a green house, another project. Neighbors replace 57 windows in 2 story Craftsman style house and I got them for free. They kept some and build a green house. But, why oh why would I need a green house, it's already summer here. Just had someone come in and help me with the dry grass along the driveway and the road, at least with snow you have no fire hazzard.

Pam said...

Yumm! Good luck with the pea dilemma! ;)

Susan said...

Let's see...if I lived there, too, you would need 10 acres of shell peas. Too much? I L.O.V.E. shell peas, but have not been able to grow them yet. This weather is too screwy. And yes, please share the recipe!

FoxyLady said...

I also really like peas from the garden, especially raw. They are so easy to freeze and turn out so well. However, they would be on the edges, crawling the fence....and, my "pets" would probably eat them all......

Kim said...

I always read and don't comment often- your blog is one of my favorites. I want to add my request for a recipe if you would be kind enough to share. I remember eating this as a child at a relatives and as an adult I've always longed for it again. Looks soooo yummy!!

Stephanie said...

I will have that same problem with corn...the boys would eat it day and night if I let them. Maybe I will just have to buy it in bulk from a farmer's market or local farmer...then all I have to do is process it.

Katidids said...

I LOVE fresh peas right out of the garden..or dried to munch on. Best snack ever. Planting ours tomorrow. Gosh, I cant get over how much late snow you have. Will you have enough time for decent crops before first frost? Ugh, talking about first frost before the last frost is here is just wrong!

Sparkless said...

Oh I gotta agree that garden fresh peas are the best. Carrots are our fave and we can't grow them.

Mama Pea said...

Lisa - Honey, we can't grow two seasons of ANYTHING up here! The problem is that it's so hot in mid to late summer when I would have to plant my second crop of peas that germination is very poor (in the hot weather). If I waited until end of August/first of September to plant them when it starts to cool off, they would never mature before the hard frost would zap the vines.

My ideal goal is to freeze 52 servings of each veggie I grow. (My "servings" feed the two of us for one meal.) Last season was a poor pea year because it got hot too fast and I harvested and froze only 23 servings. I really rationed them out this winter 'cause I knew they weren't going to last nearly long enough.

We are having a very sunny, non-snowy day today. Beautiful!

Mama Pea said...

Carolyn - Recipe comin' up, my friend. I'll try to get it posted today, but the day is already getting away from me so it may be tomorrow.

I must go now out into the garden and plant my snow peas. In the snow. Hahahaha!

Mama Pea said...

Tombstone Livestock - Lack of fire hazzard this spring is why we are very, very happy to get the moisture even in the form of snow.

Yep, I do need a greenhouse. In a big way. But it's not just the greenhouse structure that is needed but a fail-safe heating system that would be needed up here both in the spring and the fall. Ah well, dream on . . .

Mama Pea said...

Pam - I'm actually thinking of putting in another row of them this year to try to get enough. I regularly plant 72' of them each year.

Mama Pea said...

Susan - I'm surprised you can't grow them. They need to be planted in cool weather and you have that in the spring just like we do. Does it get too hot, too fast for them to mature?

Mama Pea said...

Foxy Lady - The deer would think they'd died and gone to heaven if they could wrap their little tongues around those luscious pea pods! Nope, you'd have to plant them far inside a fenced in area or you would get nary a one.

I have a friend whose dog loves the pea pods and "picks" them right off the vine every chance she gets. Nuh-uh, not in my garden she wouldn't! I'd put a stop to that really fast. When it comes to our hard-won, organically raised food, I don't share with the animals! (Not nice, am I?)

Mama Pea said...

Kim - Ah, shucks, what nice words! Thank you so much.

Yes, I will post the recipe for the creamed eggs. Later today or tomorrow for sure.

Mama Pea said...

Stephanie - Oh, yes, corn from the garden! Back in Illinois we had no trouble raising it and although we ate corn on the cob a lot directly from the garden, I always cut it off the cob to freeze for winter meals. Gosh, that was the BEST tasting corn. Up here it's hard to grow so we never have enough for the freezer.

Mama Pea said...

Katidids - I think I will do a post soon about how late (compared to all the rest of you) we have to wait to get our gardens in up here. Even if there were no snow, the ground (and air!) would still be much too cold to plant much before middle of May . . . and then only the cool weather crops could go in. So, actually this snow is good for the garden. It's providing much needed moisture and the soil will be in good shape for planting when the time comes.

Mama Pea said...

Sparkless - Carrots we can grow easily. Any root crop does really well up here . . . so if we had to survive on potatoes, onions, carrots, turnips, beets, etc. we could definitely do so. Now tomatoes, corn, eggplant, peppers . . . those we really have to work hard to get!

Kelly said...

This looks yummy! Can't wait for the recipe. The hubs loves your recipes ☺

Mama Pea said...

Kelly - Recipe just posted. Bless your hubby's little heart! :o]

Denise said...

My grandma just made the creamed peas on toast without the eggs. I think the recipe is from the early 1900's. All I know is that I get to hankering for them every once in a while and have to have them. She also taught me to put sugar on sliced tomatoes from the garden. Like a dessert but much much better!

Mama Pea said...

Denise - Welcome and thanks for commenting! Isn't it true that some of the really good recipes come from long ago when people made do with what they had? Since I'm not a protein type, I could be very happy with just the creamed peas on toast! I've heard of sugar on sliced tomatoes as being another "old timey" thing. Never tried it . . . but maybe I should!

Erin said...

I can never grow enough either! I settle for enough to sprinkle on salads now LOL. Of course if it would stop snowing you could get some peas in the ground :)

Mama Pea said...

Erin - Wonder if anyone ever planted peas THROUGH snow?? (I may be forced to try!)