Wednesday, August 22, 2012

Weighing In The Taters

I coerced Papa Pea into helping me dig up two rows of the potato patch this morning. These were the two rows that had gotten hit especially hard with blight and had virtually no vines left so I knew the potatoes in the soil weren't going to be doing any more growing.

I had dug up a portion of one of these rows a week or so ago to get some potatoes to eat because we haven't had any for ever so long, and I had a real hankering for some potato salad, plus my dear hubby had been dropping hints about how long it had been since we had had mashed potatoes and gravy. Potatoes have been selling at our organic co-op in town for $1.99 a pound and knowing I had some in the garden kept me from paying that. (I did get my potato salad after he got a meal of Swiss Steak, Mashed Potatoes and Gravy and Green Beans.)

I had taken 2-1/2 pounds when I raided the patch the other day and this morning we harvested another 9-1/2 pounds. So we got a total of 12 pounds from two rows each approximately 15 feet long. Admittedly, not a very good harvest.

The potatoes we sampled last week were solid, crisp and good flavored so these should be the same. The size has been disappointing though. I have a LOT of golf ball sized ones and only maybe three that I would call big. The rest are small to medium.

Now it'll be interesting to see what the other four rows in the patch yield. They will be our main crop of keepers for the winter . . . or as far into the winter as they will take us, so I'll leave them in the soil for a while yet.

18 comments:

  1. That's interesting, Mama Pea. I have delved into my hillbilly planters and the range in size of my Yukon golds is wild. I had two spuds that were the size of a large fist, but most were smallish. My reds had a much better yield and were uniform in size, for the most part. I'll have to say, you and Papa Pea lasted a lot longer than I did. I just HAD to dig some up last month!

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    1. Susan - I do love a good white potato for baking, but chose to plant only reds this year as we both think they're more flavorful on the whole. Next year, I will plant a row of whites though. Next year, I will plant more footage of potatoes. Next year, will be a better garden year for all of us!

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  2. Well, that might not be a very large haul, but they sure do look nice! I'm sure you'll enjoy them.
    ~~Lori

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    1. Lori - Thank you, I know we will enjoy them. Especially this first batch since we haven't had any taters for so long.

      I think of you often, Lori, and hope you can feel all of the love surrounding you during this very difficult time. Sending hugs.

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  3. Yes--but no wireworms! Enjoy em while you got em. The way things are going with the weather, you can just plant a new crop, say mid January?
    Don't laugh. We had NO snow yet end of December and were 85 in March this past spring. I can't imagine what this winter will bring. Palm trees, anyone?

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    1. No wireworms! Hallelujah and amen! I'm hoping I've done the right thing to get rid of them . . . let the soil where they were lie fallow for a year and then planted another crop in it this year. Ugh, they were awful!

      I'm really hoping for a severe winter (don't send hate mail, everyone!) to kill off all these insects that have been migrating northward because of our mild winters!

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  4. potatoes ,patatoes,tomatoes ,tamatoes,well nevermind...-you know how much food I go through around here ,but while I can get it fresh,I'm going to but even that doesn't last long in the freezer. I made beef stew yesterday and already used up some of my beams I blanched and froze, so savor the goodness while you can

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    1. judy - I know you have a crowd at your table for most meals! Mmmm, beef stew . . . you do a good job of feeding everyone. I got such a chuckle out of you referring to "feeding the animals" the other day. We've got to keep our sense of humor, don't we? Hugs to you, hard working lady!

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  5. nice looking potatoes ... that's something I have not tried. Love red potatoes for potatoe salad. Since there is just me I microwave them, cool them and then make salad.

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    1. Tombstone Livestock - I leave the skins on (our homegrown potatoes) when I make potato salad and potato soup. Adds a bit of color! Potatoes are relatively easy to grow . . . if you can avoid potato blight. Dang stuff!

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  6. Now if the potatoes did as well as the cucumbers this year.. well we would all be well fed this winter.

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    1. Jane - Boy, that's for sure! And potatoes keep a darn sight better than cucumbers, too!

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    1. CR - Yes, or cooking in with a pot roast!

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  8. Obviously cucumbers don't mind chemicals being dropped from the sky. Anyone seen this documentary yet?

    http://www.infowars.com/why-in-the-world-are-they-spraying-full-length-documentary-hd/

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    1. Freedom Acres Farm - No, haven't seen that one yet. Obviously, they haven't got the formula for stunting cucumber seeds figured out yet though.

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  9. Potatoes seem to be a disappointment all over this year, glad you are getting enough to enjoy fresh though, I just love colorful red potato salad... and Swiss Steak! - Hubby loves that too!

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    1. Erin - Papa Pea has been so good about subsisting all summer on fresh fruits and veggies and salads and simple stove top meals so I figure this fall I owe him lots of meat, potatoes and gravy!

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